Our Thoughts

TLF Gems Newsletter May 2020

1st May 2020


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Your monthly CX and insight update from TLF Research


The world isn't usually changed by special people. It's changed by ordinary people who take it on themselves to take a stand because they're trying to lead ordinary lives and something stupid gets in their way."
- Mike Monteiro, Ruined by Design


Our research has shown that customers have been very understanding of any challenges that have come about because of lockdown. As ever, the secret is honest communication, and that's just as true when it comes to culture - making sure your people feel safe, happy, and connected. You can read some of our latest research articles here.

This month we have a collection of links focused around making good decisions, staying in touch, and prioritising the right things.

Thanks for reading,

Stephen

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Stephen Hampshire

Client Manager, TLF Research

stephenhampshire@leadershipfactor.com


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Here's 8 things we think are worth your time this month...
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With astonishing speed, MIT Press have published Joshua Gans' book "Economics in the Age of COVID-19", a brilliant synopsis of the relationship between economics and epidemiology. Essential reading on the flaws in seeing economy and public health as a trade off, and how we might plan for recovery. "...pursuing public health can be consistent with superior long-run economic performance."



 
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"Bike-shedding" is a great phrase I learned via Richard Shotton. It describes the tendency for committees to discuss trivial details they understand (like bike sheds) rather than important ones they don't (like the nuclear reactor the bike sheds go with).



 
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Interesting podcast about the ways in which behavioural insights are being used in local government. Great example in the first episode of using a staggered rollout instead of a randomised controlled trial for testing. "Behavioural insights tries to change behaviour without changing people's incentives. It draws on psychology and behavioural economics to do that, and a lot of it is focused on the environment in which a decision is taken."




 
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Interesting BBC piece on why those Zoom calls are tiring us all out. and why that may be exacerbated during the pandemic. “What I'm finding is, we’re all exhausted; it doesn't matter whether they are introverts or extroverts. We are experiencing the same disruption of the familiar context during the pandemic.”




 
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Joe Leech shares a simple tool to help you prioritise, based on 4 criteria: User research, Data, Business driver, and Gut feel. "If the answer to all four dimensions is a yes, build that next. Does it meet three of the four? Then build that right after. Two dimensions, further down the priority order. Only one dimension is a yes? Either park it or investigate further in one of the other dimensions."




 
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A great idea for leaders who want a new way to talk directly to their people - start an internal podcast. "Since they aren’t publicly available, hosts can bypass external communications teams that might water down messaging or delay publication. Instead, executives have the freedom to speak frankly, show vulnerability, and be straightforward about what’s shaping their companies and industries."




 
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A passionate argument against the idea that good design is invisible (I agree). "There are three great themes in design: making something beautiful, making something easier, and making something possible. The best designs accomplish all three at once. This might involve making parts of the product invisible. But it might not. The best products are as visible as they need to be to make the activity better."




 
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Have you noticed that books about creativity tend to be a bit, well, samey? Steve Aylett's polemical little book lambastes our lack of originality, identifies the causes, and suggests a way to find genuinely new ideas. "One of the main consequences of today's infantilising culture is that the traditional denial of a child's sentient humanity has been extended to adults, especially in the workplace. Companies are now operated as if full automation has already taken place. Solutions vanish every second of every day and we will never know the geniuses lost to the cubicle or to cops in a burst of taser confetti."


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